Our Events

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Working in a Culturally Sensitive way in CBT

Taf Kunorubwe

5 July 2022

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Inherent within the ethos of the NHS and Primary Care Mental Health Services is that people from all sections of the community should have a chance to benefit from evidence-based psychological therapies. Despite this, clients from BAME communities are under-represented in referrals and tend to have poorer outcomes from Primary Care Mental Health Services (Baker, 2020). In addition, disparity in access and outcomes exist in Secondary and Specialist Mental Health Care Services. Such inequalities continue to be a cause for concern with front line staff, services, policy makers and the psychological professions.

This session will focus on current thinking and recommendations for improving outcomes for clients from diverse backgrounds using culturally sensitive CBT. Culturally Sensitive CBT tends to look much more like CBT as provided to majority service users, but with adaptations made on a case-by-case basis by therapists, service users or even interpreters (Beck, 2016).


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Emotion Regulation Therapy

Prof. Douglas Mennin & Prof. David Fresco

12 July 2022

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13 July 2022

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PLEASE NOTE:  This event is over 2 days:


Wednesday 13th July 2022  -  14.00 - 17.00 hrs

Thursday 14th July 2022  -  14.00 - 17.00 hrs


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.


Despite the success of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT), a sizable subgroup of individuals remains refractory to standardly efficacious treatments. In particular, those with “distress disorders” (including generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder, especially when they co-occur) and those who are in distressing contexts (i.e., COVID-19 pandemic, familial caregiving), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. These patients often display heightened sensitivity to threat/safety and reward/loss contexts as well as perseveration (i.e., worry, ruminate) as a way to manage this motivationally relevant distress yet often to the detriment of engaging new contextual learning. Using this hypothesized profile as a framework, Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed as a theoretically-derived, evidence based, treatment integrating principles from traditional and contemporary CBT with basic and translational findings from affect science to offer a blueprint for improving intervention by focusing on the motivational responses and corresponding regulatory characteristics of individuals with distress disorders. Initial ERT findings demonstrate considerable evidence for efficacy in both distress disorders as well as distressing contexts. Evidence for underlying proposed mechanisms has also been demonstrated.

Cognitive Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorders in Adults & Adolescents

Prof. David Clark

6 September 2022

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Social Anxiety Disorder is common and remarkably persistent in the absence of treatment. It typically starts in childhood or adolescence and frequently leads to occupational and education underachievement. Interpersonal relationships are impaired. Dissatisfaction with the way that life is progressing often triggers depressive episodes and there is a heightened risk of alcohol and drug abuse.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Cognitive Therapy for PTSD in children and young people

Prof. Richard Meiser-Stedman

12 September 2022

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Trauma exposure is a very common experience in childhood and adolescence. Approximately 7% of children and young people experience develop PTSD at some point in their lives, with as many as 3-4% having PTSD at any given time. PTSD can be a chronic condition, lasting years or decades, and can have a major impact on broader mental and physical health.

While PTSD can be devastating condition, there is good reason for hope – the past twenty years has seen considerable evidence amassed that support the effectiveness of psychological therapies to treat PTSD in youth. In this workshop we will be looking at one form of talking therapy in particular, Cognitive Therapy for PTSD (CT-PTSD). Heavily informed by Anke Ehlers and David M. Clark’s work with PTSD in adults, this approach has been carefully evaluated in children and adolescents, in both longitudinal studies and randomised controlled trials. CT-PTSD is based on addressing the key processes we know play in the onset and maintenance of PTSD: the way in which children’s trauma memories are stored in the brain, how they see themselves and others in light of what happened, and how they manage their PTSD symptoms. While working with PTSD can be an anxiety-provoking experience for clinicians, we be looking at the firm foundation that we can have for confident, evidence-based practice in this area.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Psychological Treatment of Insomnia

Dr Kirstie Anderson

14 September 2022

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Sleep is vital for normal mood, memory and metabolism. While sleep and circadian rhythm disturbance is seen in all mental health disorders, insomnia disorder also causes significant distress. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is evidence based, effective and remains underused despite meta-analyses confirming large effect size but also showing CBTi strategies remain effective long term (van der Zweerde et al. 2019). CBTi remains effective for insomnia comorbid with other psychiatric and medical conditions


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Brief CBT for non-underweight eating disorders: An evidence-based approach

Prof. Glenn Waller

19 September 2022

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Eating disorders have very high personal, social and health costs, and the numbers of patients referred currently exceeds the capacity of specialist services to treat them all. In particular, individuals who have a non-anorexic presentation (e.g., binge eating disorder; bulimia nervosa) make up about 80% of adults with eating disorders. However, such patients are likely to end up on very long waiting lists or might be referred to IAPT, primary care and secondary care services, where training and skills in working with eating disorders are very limited, and where brief, effective therapies are needed.


This workshop will detail a new development in CBT for eating disorders (CBT-ED) that is designed to address this need for brief, effective therapy for non-underweight adults and adolescents. Ten sessions CBT for eating disorders (CBT-T) was introduced as a manualised treatment in 2019, and now features in the pathway of a large number of specialist eating disorder services, as well as primary care and IAPT services. It is based on evidence about what works in CBT-ED and recent developments in CBT (especially inhibitory learning). Approximately a dozen studies have demonstrated its effectiveness, which is at a level comparable with that of Fairburn’s (2008) enhanced CBT, even though it is half the length of that longer therapy.


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Facilitating Cognitive Change and Enhancing CBT Skills in the Treatment of Depression

Prof. Daniel R. Strunk

4 October 2022

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5 October 2022

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PLEASE NOTE:  This event is over 2 days:


Wednesday 5th October 2022  -  13.30 - 16.30 hrs

Thursday 6th October 2022  -  13.30 - 16.30 hrs


Cognitive therapy or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression is a well-established evidence-based treatment. CBT offers acute benefits comparable to state of the art pharmacotherapy, with the considerable advantage of long-term benefits that persist when treatment is discontinued. Although establishing the mechanisms of a psychotherapy definitively has been difficult, a body of carefully conducted studies suggest that the experience of cognitive change and the development of CBT skills appear to play an important role in explaining CBT’s effects. By utilizing ongoing measures of patients’ experience of cognitive change and the development of CBT skills over the course of treatment, our research has been highlighting how therapists can foster these key change processes. Utilizing cognitive change procedures with high adherence to the treatment model in ways that elicit positive contributions from clients appears to be key.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Adjustment to diagnosis of a long-term physical condition

Prof. Rona Moss-Morris

18 October 2022

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Around 30% of people with long-term physical health conditions (LTCs) experience comorbid anxiety and depression. For many, comorbid anxiety and depression (distress) is linked to difficulties adjusting to the challenges of the LTC. Professor Moss Morris and colleagues have developed a transdiagnostic model of adjustment to LTCs (TMA-LTC). Following a systematic review to collate pre-existing evidence-based models of adjustment across LTCs, models of adjustment for a range of LTCs have been synthesised into a new preliminary TMA-LTC. The model proposes that acute critical events or ongoing illness stressors can disrupt emotional equilibrium, and that whether a person returns to equilibrium and achieves good psychological adjustment depends on a number of cognitive and behavioural factors, as well as their interpersonal, intrapersonal, environmental and illness-specific contexts. This empirically and clinically informed model provides clinicians with a useful guide for assessment, formulation and treatment in the context of psychological adjustment to LTCs.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

Current approaches to treating Generalised Anxiety Disorder

Prof. Colette Hirsch

3 November 2022

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Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is a debilitating condition, characterized by negative interpretations about ambiguous situations. Therapists find GAD hard to treat. Understanding how bouts of worry start and what keeps them in GAD can be particularly helpful when formulating and intervening with GAD. Theory-driven experimental research guided selection and refinements of CBT techniques for GAD. Hirsch and Mathews’ (2012) model specifies three key research-supported processes that maintain uncontrollable worry in GAD: implicit cognitive biases such as negative interpretation bias and attention bias, generalized verbal thinking style, and impaired ability to re-direct attentional control away from worry. Specific CBT techniques that target were adapted to maximise impact on these key processes are focused on in CBT sessions.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Social Anxiety Disorder: Understanding and Assessment at LICBT

Jenny Lam

16 November 2022

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Social Anxiety Disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders, with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 12% in the adult population (Kessler et al., 2005; NICE 2013). Social Anxiety Disorder frequently leads to significant impairment in an individual’s functioning, poor relationships, impaired work and educational performance and diminished quality of life (Keller, 2003; Mendlowicz & Stein, 2000; Kessler et al., 2005).

Social Anxiety Disorder also has a high comorbidity rate with several other mental health disorders, including depression, and substance use (NICE, 2013). Misidentification and avoidance behaviours result in only 50% of individuals seeking treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder, and treatment is usually only sought after several years of distress (Otto et al., 2001).


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

Trauma and PTSD: understanding and assessment at LICBT

Dr Nick Grey and Clea Alber

24 November 2022

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Trauma is very common in the lives of those who seek help for emotional difficulties. One of the possible presenting problems that may arise is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Understanding the impact of traumatic experiences, and accurately identifying PTSD, are important in ensuring that people are offered the most appropriate treatments. Within primary care services the initial assessment or triage is commonly brief and this inevitably presents challenges.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

CBT for Health Anxiety and Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Prof. Winfried Rief

29 November 2022

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Physical symptoms are the major reason to seek medical treatment for most patients. However, most physical symptoms cannot be explained and understood only by a pure biomedical concept, but psychological factors play a major role in the perception, interpretation and consequences of physical symptoms. Their classification (e.g., using the concept of somatic symptom disorder) will be presented. Psychological factors that contribute to an amplified perception of physical symptoms as well as causal factors for the development of complaints beyond biomedical processes will be highlighted. A special emphasis will be given to the treatment of physical symptoms in psychosomatic and medical conditions in general. While many patients are reluctant to psychological re-attributions of their symptoms, pathways how to motivate these patients to participate in psychological interventions will be shown. Finally, a structured approach how to treat these patients successfully will be presented. Scientific evidence confirmed that the presented treatment approach is highly successful and can help to improve patients’ capacity to cope with physical symptoms. Further benefits can result from a patient-tailored approach to pain and other somatic symptoms.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

Honing Low Intensity Psychoeducation Group Delivery Skills

Liz Ruth

8 December 2022

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Despite a common perception that individual appointments with a practitioner are the most acceptable and effective way to deliver a psychological intervention, Low Intensity group interventions that are in-line with NICE guidance as to content and duration can be both exciting and effective. Teaching the theory and stages of Low Intensity psychological interventions (psychoeducation) is a foundational skill in Low Intensity practice. Low Intensity group-based psychoeducation, both in large group didactic formats and smaller workshop-style interactive group settings, is familiar to most Low Intensity practitioners in the IAPT programme. The group education format can support both single and multi-strand interventions comfortably and appropriately, while the benefits of the group environment in normalising the experience of common mental health disorders can enhance the clinical effectiveness of the interventions. At the same time the efficiency of delivering evidence-based information to larger groups of patients make group-based psychoeducation both time and cost efficient. A number of factors can affect the success of a Low Intensity psychoeducation course, from practitioner effects to group composition. As the Low Intensity Professions expand, this is a timely moment to revisit key skills and guidance for delivery of effective Low Intensity psychoeducation courses.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

CBT for Mental Contamination

Prof. Maureen Whittal & Prof. Roz Shafran

14 December 2022

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Why can Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) be so difficult to treat? This was the question that perplexed the late Professor Jack Rachman. In the early 2000s (Rachman, 2004, 2006), he proposed that an important reason that existing interventions sometimes failed to be effective was that clinicians and researchers had failed to identify a form of OCD that he termed ‘mental contamination’. Over the past 25 years Mental Contamination (MC) has become recognised as a distinct and transdiagnostic construct. MC is defined as feelings of contamination, often located internally, that arise in the absence of direct physical contact with a contaminant, with the source proposed to be human. A recent systematic review involving the presenters found 58 papers on mental contamination,. The studies demonstrated that far from being a rare, unusual form of OCD as might have originally been hypothesised, it was surprisingly common with up to 46% of participants with clinically elevated symptoms of OCD (Coughtrey et al., 2012) reporting aspects of MC. Although particularly intertwined with contact contamination, the studies showed that MC was also associated with a broad range of OCD themes, other psychopathology such as PTSD and psychological constructs such as self-perception. Furthermore, MC tends to behave in the same way as other forms of OCD, notably being associated with imagery and having magical properties such as spreading by contagion.

The original concept of MC proposed that there were different manifestations of MC including visual contamination, self-contamination and morphing. The literature has not followed the original conceptual distinctions between the different forms of MC although these remain clinically important. Instead, the focus has been on the assessment and formulation of MC and its triggers including trauma and, notably, the role of betrayal. Appropriate identification, assessment and treatment of MC can be essential for people whose OCD has previously been classified as ‘treatment resistant’.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

CBT for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Dr Jennifer Wild

12 January 2023

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Cognitive therapy is rooted in the idea that whilst people may face gritty times, it is the meaning they make of them that matters. A patient’s symptoms, emotions, and behaviours are seen as inextricably linked to their thinking. Cognitive therapists extend curiosity and compassion to elicit then better understand thoughts and processes that may be maintaining distress and this understanding or formulation is integral to guiding treatment. CT-PTSD is based on a robust cognitive model that identifies three core processes that keep the disorder going (Ehlers & Clark, 2000). The treatment aims to modify these processes through intervention that targets trauma memories, triggers, unhelpful behaviours and thoughts. Updating painful meanings linked to the trauma memory with information and often images that address relevant cognitive themes is a key part of the treatment. Cognitive themes typically relate to anger, shame, guilt, betrayal, overgeneralised danger, loss or permanent change. CT-PTSD is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and numerous international guidelines as a first line treatment for the disorder. The treatment leads to high rates of recovery, is often described as life-changing, can be delivered in about 10 to 12 sessions and easily adapted for remote delivery during pandemic-working.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Working with autistic clients

Prof. Will Mandy & Dr Richard Pender

19 January 2023

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There is growing recognition of an autism mental health crisis. Autistic people across the lifespan and of all genders experience increased prevalence of a range of mental health conditions, leading to reduced quality of life and premature mortality (Lai et al., 2019). In addition, autistic people have described negative experiences of accessing mental health support (Camm-Crosbie et al., 2019). In recognition of this, the NHS Long-Term plan highlights better care for autistic people, including mental health care, as a priority (2019).

Challenges in routine clinical practice include recognising possible undiagnosed autism, and distinguishing autism characteristics from co-occurring mental health conditions. Autistic people report distinct mental health-related experiences, including masking or camouflaging of autism traits, meltdowns and shutdowns, and autistic burnout (Hull, Petrides & Mandy, 2020). Also, while evidence-based adapted psychological therapies are effective for this client group, clinicians commonly lack confidence in making adaptations (Cooper, Loades & Russell, 2018). To address these needs, sustained improvements must be made across multiple levels of service delivery (Mandy, 2022).


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Using Imagery in Cognitive Therapy

Dr Susie Hales

24 January 2023

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In Beck’s cognitive theory of emotional disorders (1976), the importance of images in addition to verbal thoughts was highlighted, though in modern cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) images have often been neglected in favour of a focus on verbal thought processes.

In recent years, however, there has been increased attention on mental imagery in CBT, with a mounting body of research evidence pointing to the role of imagery in the maintenance of a variety of mental health difficulties, including depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, psychosis and others.

This workshop aims to deepen your understanding of the science of mental imagery and give new ideas about ways you might use imagery in your clinical practice.

The workshop will provide a practical guide to using imagery within the framework of a CBT approach. We will cover assessment, formulation and intervention, including how to integrate imagery skills with other tools in the CBT repertoire.


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Evidence Based Treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Dr Fugen Neziroglu & Dr Sony Khemlani

2 February 2023

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3 February 2023

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PLEASE NOTE:  This event is over 2 days:


Thursday 2nd February 2023  -  14.00 - 17.00 hrs

Friday 3rd February 2023  -  14.00 - 17.00 hrs


Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is classified under obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders due to its many shared similarities with OCD, including preoccupations associated with engagement in safety behaviors. Patients with BDD have a perceived or imagined defect in their physical appearance, and may engage in behaviors such as mirror gazing, camouflaging, ruminating, skin picking, intense social comparison, and needless dermatological treatment or cosmetic surgery. Though there has been a surge of effective pharmacological and cognitive behavioral treatments in the past ten years, BDD is still under recognized and often misdiagnosed. This seminar will begin with a review of the theoretical and empirical models of the psychopathology of and treatment for BDD. It will continue with discussion of and practical instruction on strategies to mitigate symptoms, such as image rescripting, attentional training, habit reversal, and exposure and response prevention. Through recent and ongoing research, our ability to treat and recognize BDD has dramatically improved our ability to relieve a significant amount of the poor quality of life and social isolation that many patients with BDD experience. This workshop will capitalize on these recent improvements through the emphasis of new cognitive and behavioral treatment strategies for this challenging disorder.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Psychological Approaches to Covid and Long Covid

Prof. Daryl O'Connor

8 February 2023

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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents the greatest international biopsychosocial emergency the world has faced for a century. It has changed how we work, educate, parent, socialise, shop, communicate and travel. Psychology and psychological science continues to have an integral role to offer in helping individuals, organisations, societies to recover. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of large numbers of the population, in particular, those living with pre-existing mental health conditions. Moreover, it has also been associated with a growing number of people experiencing COVID-related symptoms many months after contracting the virus (e.g., breathlessness, “brain fog”, lethargy, anxiety and stress). This webinar event will: 1) consider research findings regarding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health outcomes, outline which groups have been shown to be most vulnerable and describe risk factors and protective factors; and 2) describe and characterise our current understanding of long Covid symptoms, consider evidence of the relationship between triggers and long Covid symptoms and discuss implications for the management of long Covid.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

Effective use of routine outcome monitoring and feedback in psychotherapy

Dr Jaime Delgadillo

22 February 2023

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Routine outcome monitoring (ROM) involves the use of psychometric measures in health care. Typically, ROM can be used in two ways. First, measures collected before and after therapy can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. The second application integrates measurement into the therapy process, by continuously reviewing information about the patient’s treatment response. This approach, also referred to as progress feedback, enables the therapist to determine if treatment is working as expected, or if some adjustments may be necessary. The latest and most comprehensive meta-analysis of controlled trials in this area indicates that progress feedback improves treatment outcomes and reduces dropout (de Jong et al., 2021). This workshop will guide psychotherapists on how to effectively integrate ROM and feedback into their practice.


The event will be equivalent to 1.1/2hrs of CPD.

Optimising outcomes in the cognitive behavioural treatment of OCD

Prof. Roz Shafran

7 March 2023

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OCD is a common, disabling mental health problem which impacts significantly on quality of life. OCD usually takes a chronic course with low rates of spontaneous remission. A recent  clinical significance analysis of manualised psychological interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder found low recovery rates with only one-third of treated patients being considered to have recovered (Rigby et al., 2021). The same meta-analysis reported that individual cognitive therapy (CT) was the most effective intervention. This workshop will consider how to optimise outcomes by harnessing recent significant advances in the understanding and treatment of OCD including the development of methods to increase engagement and optimise the chance of recovery. These treatment techniques incorporate a range of patient focused, advanced behavioural experiments which must be conducted with both skill and compassion.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

CBT for Adult ADHD: An Implementation-Focused Approach

Dr J Russell Ramsay

9 March 2023

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Increasing numbers of adult clients are seeking evaluation and treatment for adult ADHD. Although medications offer symptom relief, most adults with ADHD will require concurrent psychosocial treatment modified to address their unique needs, especially the consistent use of the known coping strategies. Cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) adapted for adult ADHD is an evidence-supported treatment, though most clients report that they “know what to do, but have difficulties doing it,” which reflects the fact that ADHD is a performance problem, not a knowledge problem. In this webinar, Dr. Ramsay will review the contemporary understanding of the nature of ADHD and how this model informs psychosocial treatment. He will illustrate the components of an implementation-focused CBT approach adapted to adult ADHD, including the role of cognitions, behaviours, and emotions as well as showing a video demonstration of a session of this approach.


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Time Limited Schema Therapy

Dr Helen Startup and Janis Briedis - Co-Directors of the Schema Therapy School

13 March 2023

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Further information about this workshop will be advised soon


The event will be equivalent to 2.3/4hrs of CPD.

Working with Parents of Children with anxiety

Cathy Creswell

16 March 2023

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Anxiety problems are extremely common in children, can interfere with life at home, at school, and with friends and, if untreated, can run a chronic course. Parents can play a strong role in helping their children overcome anxiety disorders if given the right tools. Parent-led CBT approaches provide a means to deliver treatment efficiently, bringing potential to increase access to evidence-based treatment. However, therapists can face a range of challenges in implementing the approach, including:

  • confidence in working with parents

  • challenges with engaging parents with the approach (e.g. where parents lack parenting efficacy, where the problem is located outside of the home, where parents/carers have competing priorities due to challenging circumstances or co- occurring difficulties);

  • managing parents’ differences of opinion about the nature of the problem and how to manage it;

  • challenges in applying specific techniques, including working with parents to collaboratively identify maintenance cycles and supporting parents to design exposures that effectively test children’s fears.


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

Working with Complicated and Complex PTSD.

Dr Kerry Young

29 March 2023

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There are well-established protocols for the treatment of PTSD using trauma-focused CBT (TF-CBT) (e.g.  Ehlers et al., 2005). However, there is relatively little information about how to adapt TF-CBT for more complicated and/or Complex PTSD, such as that resulting from multiple traumatic events, or from prolonged exposure to threat, or where dissociation is a key feature of someone’s presentation. Many clinicians are confused about the about whether or not they need to phase-based interventions with this group of clients (e.g. De Jongh et al., 2016.)


The event will be equivalent to 5.1/2hrs of CPD.

No Events Found